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ChatGPT Prompt Engineering

Prompt Engineering With ChatGPT
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Learn Prompt Engineering with ChatGPT

Prompt engineering is the art of crafting natural language prompts that can be used to create engaging and effective conversational agents. These agents can be chatbots, voice assistants, or AI tutors, and they can be used to do a variety of things, such as provide customer service, answer questions, or help people learn new things.

One way to learn prompt engineering is to use ChatGPT, a web-based platform that allows you to create and test your own prompts. ChatGPT is powered by a state-of-the-art language model that can generate coherent and diverse texts from a given prompt.

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Transcript

When it comes to writing prompts, there’s definitely some best practices.

And I wanna talk about five of the more important ones for beginners so that you could create your prompts as efficiently and as accurately as possible.

The reason is is because ChatGPT is really a data structure behind the interface, that data structure was developed by humans.

Because it was developed by humans, we need to enter prompts that are going to actually help us query the appropriate information that chat GPT is going to get back to us.

Because of that, we need to be clear and concise into what chat, GPT should do. So we want to define the role. Generally, when we define the role, we’re going to want to use a verb.

So that verb is going to be similar to anything from list. So let’s say, provide a list of top ten things to do in Orlando, so you have that verb list. And then you have provider list. Right? So that is providing that role to chat GPT.

Provide context.

So context meaning that I need to have a list for a specific subject.

What is that subject?

Is it things to do?

Is it cooking trot?

Is it writing an essay?

What is that specific context?

Now, the task or question is going to need to be defined clearly. So what we want to do here is when we define chat, GPT’s role in context, we need to assemble the question that we’re going to ask GPT to respond to clearly.

So what we wanna do is state our prompt similar to something like this. And again, all of this we’re gonna go through in the upcoming demonstrations in various forms, so you could see how all this works. Now also be aware too that everything I’m talking about here is documented in the free ebook guide that I believe is called the chat GPT prompt guide that is available as part of the course. So there’s several documentation items that have been provided to you in the course.

Please make sure you download those. That guide is in that. Okay. So now, as far as stating the task a question, let’s say that I have a simple question.

For example, what is the best way to get started as a cloud engineer.

Well, ChatGPT will then look at that will go into its various forms of data retrieval and its data lakes and data structures, and then decide based on the algorithms that they have will provide you a response.

So we need to ask the question so that it can decipher what has been entered really by a human.

And that response has provided you back as basically a response in that chat that you’re having with chat, EBT.

Then we need to set constraints.

Now, these constraints could be anything from limit to ten. So when I say the top ten, that’s really a constraint that we’re adding to it. Or what I could say is, in a specific city, in a third month, So you’ll see in the upcoming demonstrations that I go through an example of like Disney World, for example, or travel like what are the top ten places for single women to go that are over fifty. Right? So those are constrained.

That I’m applying to my specific prompt.

What exactly would be a response expectation?

Well, this could be anything from please provide a list between this month and this month, or provide a specific recipe using this specific type of ingredients.

For example, if let’s say you’re Jewish, You need something kosher. You could tell chat GPT to use kosher ingredients.

So the expectation here is that it’s not going to give you non kosher ingredients.

And we’ll go into a lot of this in the demonstrations in more detail.

Now, With that said, again, please refer to the chat GPT prompt guide for more detailed explanations on these best practices. And there’s also more best practices in that guide. I’m just covering the top five right now just to get you started.

With that said, let’s move on to the first demonstration of the module.

What is Prompt Engineering?

In simple terms, prompt engineering is the process of designing and optimizing natural language prompts that can be used to control the behavior of conversational agents. A good prompt will be clear, concise, and specific, and it will help the agent to understand what you are trying to achieve.

For example, if you want to use a chatbot to provide customer service, you might create a prompt that says something like, “I am having trouble with my product. Can you help me?” This prompt is clear, concise, and specific, and it tells the chatbot exactly what you need help with.

In this blog post, we will show you how to use ChatGPT to learn prompt engineering for some common natural language tasks, such as sentiment analysis, text summarization, and question answering. We will also provide some tips and best practices for creating effective prompts that can elicit the desired responses from the model.

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Sentiment Analysis

Sentiment analysis is the task of identifying and extracting the emotional tone or attitude of a text, such as positive, negative, or neutral. Sentiment analysis can be useful for analyzing customer feedback, social media posts, product reviews, and other types of texts that express opinions or emotions.

To create a prompt for sentiment analysis using ChatGPT, you need to provide some examples of texts and their corresponding sentiments, as well as a query text that you want the model to analyze. For example:

Text: I love this product! It works great and it’s easy to use.
Sentiment: Positive

Text: This is the worst movie I have ever seen. The plot was boring and the acting was terrible.
Sentiment: Negative

Text: The weather is nice today. I think I’ll go for a walk.
Sentiment: Neutral

Query: How do you feel about this blog post?
The model will then try to infer the sentiment of the query text based on the examples provided. In this case, the model might generate something like:
Sentiment: Neutral

To improve the prompt, you can add more examples of texts and sentiments from different domains and genres, as well as use different words or phrases to express the same sentiment. For example:

Text: This book is amazing! I couldn’t put it down. The author has a brilliant way with words.
Sentiment: Positive

Text: I hate this game! It’s so frustrating and unfair. The graphics are awful and the controls are clunky.
Sentiment: Negative

Text: The pizza was okay. Nothing special, but not bad either.
Sentiment: Neutral

Query: How do you feel about this blog post?

Text Summarization

Text summarization is the task of creating a short and concise summary of a longer text, such as an article, a report, or a story. Text summarization can help users quickly grasp the main idea or key points of a text without having to read the whole document.

To create a prompt for text summarization using ChatGPT, you need to provide some examples of texts and their corresponding summaries, as well as a query text that you want the model to summarize. For example:

Text: Prompt engineering is a skill that involves designing and optimizing natural language prompts for conversational agents, such as chatbots, voice assistants, and AI tutors. Prompt engineering can help create more engaging, natural, and effective interactions between humans and machines, as well as improve the performance and accuracy of natural language understanding and generation models.
Summary: Prompt engineering is the skill of creating prompts for conversational agents.

Text: ChatGPT is a web-based platform that allows you to create and test your own prompts for various natural language tasks, such as sentiment analysis, text summarization, question answering, and more. ChatGPT is powered by GPT-3, a state-of-the-art language model that can generate coherent and diverse texts from a given prompt.
Summary: ChatGPT is a platform for creating prompts for natural language tasks using GPT-3.

Query: In this blog post, we will show you how to use ChatGPT to learn prompt engineering for some common natural language tasks. We will also provide some tips and best practices for creating effective prompts that can elicit the desired responses from the model.

The model will then try to generate a summary of the query text based on the examples provided. In this case, the model might generate something like:

Summary: This blog post teaches how to use ChatGPT for prompt engineering with tips and best practices.

To improve the prompt, you can add more examples of texts and summaries from different domains and genres, as well as use different words or phrases to express the same idea. For example:

Text: Sentiment analysis is the task of identifying and extracting the emotional tone or attitude of a text, such as positive, negative, or neutral. Sentiment analysis can be useful for analyzing customer feedback, social media posts, product reviews, and other types of texts that express opinions or emotions.
Summary: Sentiment analysis is the task of detecting the emotion of a text.

Text: Text summarization is the task of creating a short and concise summary of a longer text, such as an article, a report, or a story. Text summarization can help users quickly grasp the main idea or key points of a text without having to read the whole document.
Summary: Text summarization is the task of making a brief summary of a long text.

Query: In this blog post, we will show you how to use ChatGPT to learn prompt engineering for some common natural language tasks. We will also provide some tips and best practices for creating effective prompts that can elicit the desired responses from the model.

Question Answering

Question answering is the task of providing a direct and specific answer to a natural language question, such as who, what, when, where, why, or how. Question answering can be useful for retrieving information from large collections of documents, such as Wikipedia, news articles, books, or manuals.

To create a prompt for question answering using ChatGPT, you need to provide some examples of questions and answers, as well as a query question that you want the model to answer. For example:

Question: What is prompt engineering?

Answer: Prompt engineering is a skill that involves designing and optimizing natural language prompts for conversational agents.

Question: What is ChatGPT?
Answer: ChatGPT is a web-based platform that allows you to create and test your own prompts for various natural language tasks.

Question: Who created GPT-3?
Answer: GPT-3 was created by OpenAI, a research organization dedicated to creating artificial intelligence that can benefit humanity.

Query: How can I learn prompt engineering with ChatGPT?

The model will then try to generate an answer to the query question based on the examples provided. In this case, the model might generate something like:

Answer: You can learn prompt engineering with ChatGPT by following this blog post and experimenting with different prompts for different tasks on the platform.

To improve the prompt, you can add more examples of questions and answers from different domains and genres, as well as use different words or phrases to ask or answer the same question. For example:

Question: What does prompt engineering mean?
Answer: Prompt engineering is a skill that involves designing and optimizing natural language prompts for conversational agents.

Question: What is the purpose of ChatGPT?
Answer: ChatGPT is a web-based platform that allows you to create and test your own prompts for various natural language tasks.

Question: Which organization developed GPT-3?
Answer: GPT-3 was developed by OpenAI, a research organization dedicated to creating artificial intelligence that can benefit humanity.

Query: How can I learn prompt engineering with ChatGPT?

More Advanced Prompt Engineering Techniques


Sure, here is a summary paragraph about some of the advanced techniques involved in prompt engineering:

Advanced Techniques in Prompt Engineering

In addition to the basic techniques of clear, concise, and specific prompts, there are a number of advanced techniques that can be used to improve the performance of prompt engineering. These techniques include:

  • Reinforcement learning (RL): RL can be used to train models to generate better prompts by rewarding them for generating prompts that produce desired outputs.
  • Few-Shot Prompting: Few-Shot Prompting is a technique that allows models to learn to perform new tasks with only a few examples. This can be useful for tasks that are difficult to define or that require a lot of data to learn.
  • Chain-of-thought: Chain-of-thought is a technique that allows models to generate more complex and nuanced responses by breaking down the task into a series of smaller steps.
  • Generated Knowledge: Generated Knowledge is a technique that allows models to learn from the data they generate. This can be useful for tasks that require a lot of creativity or that require the model to learn from its own experiences.
  • Tree of Thoughts: Tree of Thoughts is a technique that allows models to generate more structured and organized responses by breaking down the task into a tree of different possible outcomes.
  • Self-Consistency Prompting: Self-Consistency Prompting is a technique that allows models to generate more consistent and coherent responses by requiring them to be consistent with their own previous responses.

These are just a few of the advanced techniques that can be used to improve the performance of prompt engineering. By using these techniques, you can create prompts that are more effective at controlling the behavior of conversational agents and that can be used to achieve a wider range of goals. Read below for further details on these techniques.

Reinforcement learning (RL)

Reinforcement learning (RL) is a type of machine learning that allows us to train models to learn how to perform tasks by trial and error. In the context of prompt engineering, we can use RL to train models to generate better prompts by rewarding them for generating prompts that produce desired outputs.

The basic idea is to create a reward function that measures the quality of a prompt. For example, we could define a reward function that rewards a prompt for generating a response that is both relevant and creative. We could then train a model to generate prompts by rewarding it for generating prompts that have high rewards.

The model would start by generating random prompts, and it would be rewarded for the prompts that produced desired outputs. Over time, the model would learn to generate prompts that are more likely to produce desired outputs.

Here is an example of how RL can be used to train models to generate better prompts:

  1. We start by defining a reward function that measures the quality of a prompt. For example, we could define a reward function that rewards a prompt for generating a response that is both relevant and creative.
  2. We then train a model to generate prompts by rewarding it for generating prompts that have high rewards. The model would start by generating random prompts, and it would be rewarded for the prompts that produced desired outputs.
  3. Over time, the model would learn to generate prompts that are more likely to produce desired outputs.

This is just a basic overview of how RL can be used to train models to generate better prompts. There are many different ways to implement RL, and the specific implementation will depend on the specific task that we are trying to achieve.

Here are some of the advantages of using RL to train models to generate better prompts:

  • RL can be used to train models to generate prompts that are specifically tailored to a given task.
  • RL can be used to train models to generate prompts that are more robust to noise and adversarial attacks.
  • RL can be used to train models to generate prompts that are more creative and original.

However, there are also some challenges associated with using RL to train models to generate better prompts:

  • RL can be computationally expensive.
  • RL can be difficult to tune.
  • RL can be unstable.

Despite these challenges, RL is a promising approach to training models to generate better prompts. As the field of RL continues to develop, we can expect to see even more effective methods being developed that will enable us to train models to generate even more effective prompts.

Few-Shot Prompting

Few-shot prompting is a technique that uses a few examples to guide a large language model (LLM) to generate a desired response. The examples are called “shots,” and they are typically provided to the LLM in the prompt.

For example, let’s say we want to use an LLM to write a poem about love. We could provide the LLM with a few examples of poems about love, and then we could prompt the LLM to write a new poem about love. The LLM would use the examples to learn about the structure and content of poems about love, and it would use this information to generate a new poem.

Few-shot prompting is a powerful technique that can be used to achieve a variety of tasks. Here are some examples of how few-shot prompting can be used:

  • Generating creative text formats. For example, we could use few-shot prompting to generate poems, code, scripts, musical pieces, email, letters, etc.
  • Answering questions in an informative way. For example, we could use few-shot prompting to answer questions about factual topics, or to provide summaries of factual topics.
  • Solving logical reasoning problems. For example, we could use few-shot prompting to solve math problems, or to answer questions about logic.

Few-shot prompting is still a relatively new technique, but it is rapidly gaining popularity. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more powerful applications of few-shot prompting.

Here are some additional examples of how few-shot prompting can be used:

  • Classifying text. We could use few-shot prompting to train an LLM to classify text into different categories, such as news, fiction, or social media.
  • Summarizing text. We could use few-shot prompting to train an LLM to summarize text, either automatically or in response to a user query.
  • Generating code. We could use few-shot prompting to train an LLM to generate code, either in a specific programming language or in a general-purpose language.

These are just a few examples of how few-shot prompting can be used. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more applications of few-shot prompting in the future.

Chain-of-thought prompting

Chain-of-thought prompting is a type of few-shot prompting that uses a series of intermediate steps to guide a large language model (LLM) to generate a desired response. The intermediate steps are called “chain of thought,” and they are typically provided to the LLM in the prompt.

For example, let’s say we want to use an LLM to solve a math problem. We could provide the LLM with a few examples of math problems, and we could also provide the LLM with a chain of thought that shows how to solve the math problem. The LLM would use the examples and the chain of thought to learn how to solve the math problem, and it would then use this information to solve the math problem.

Chain-of-thought prompting is a powerful technique that can be used to achieve a variety of tasks. Here are some examples of how chain-of-thought prompting can be used:

  • Solving math problems. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to solve math problems, such as arithmetic problems, algebra problems, and geometry problems.
  • Solving logic problems. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to solve logic problems, such as reasoning problems and probability problems.
  • Answering questions in an informative way. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to answer questions in an informative way, even if the questions are complex or challenging.

Chain-of-thought prompting is still a relatively new technique, but it is rapidly gaining popularity. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more powerful applications of chain-of-thought prompting.

Here are some additional examples of how chain-of-thought prompting can be used:

  • Generating creative text formats. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to generate creative text formats, such as poems, code, scripts, musical pieces, email, letters, etc.
  • Classifying text. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to train an LLM to classify text into different categories, such as news, fiction, or social media.
  • Summarizing text. We could use chain-of-thought prompting to train an LLM to summarize text, either automatically or in response to a user query.

These are just a few examples of how chain-of-thought prompting can be used. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more applications of chain-of-thought prompting in the future.

Here are some examples of chain-of-thought prompts:

  • Math problem:
    • Prompt: “Solve the following math problem: 2 + 2 = ?”
    • Chain of thought: “First, add 2 and 2. Then, the answer is 4.”
  • Logic problem:
    • Prompt: “Is the following statement true or false: If it is raining, then the ground is wet.”
    • Chain of thought: “First, define what it means for it to be raining. Then, define what it means for the ground to be wet. Then, determine if the statement is true or false.”
  • Question:
    • Prompt: “What is the capital of France?”
    • Chain of thought: “First, define what it means for a city to be the capital of a country. Then, determine which city is the capital of France.”

Generated Knowledge Prompting

Generated knowledge prompting is a technique that uses additional knowledge provided as part of the context to improve the performance of large-scale language models (LLMs) on complex tasks such as commonsense reasoning.

The basic idea is to generate knowledge statements that are relevant to the task at hand, and then to provide these statements as additional input to the LLM. The LLM can then use this knowledge to generate more accurate and informative responses.

Here are some examples of generated knowledge prompts:

  • Commonsense reasoning:
    • Prompt: “What is the capital of France?”
    • Knowledge statements: “The capital of France is Paris.” “Paris is a city in France.” “France is a country in Europe.”
  • Natural language inference:
    • Prompt: “Is the following statement true or false: If it is raining, then the ground is wet.”
    • Knowledge statements: “Rain makes the ground wet.” “Wet ground is slippery.”
  • Question answering:
    • Prompt: “What is the meaning of the word ‘love’?”
    • Knowledge statements: “Love is a strong feeling of affection and care for another person.” “Love can be expressed in many different ways.” “Love is an important part of human relationships.”

Generated knowledge prompting has been shown to be effective for a variety of tasks, and it is a promising technique that has the potential to significantly improve the performance of LLMs on a variety of tasks.

Here are some of the benefits of using generated knowledge prompting:

  • Improved accuracy: Generated knowledge prompting can help to improve the accuracy of LLMs on a variety of tasks. This is because the knowledge statements provide the LLM with additional information that can be used to generate more accurate responses.
  • Increased informativeness: Generated knowledge prompting can also help to increase the informativeness of LLMs’ responses. This is because the knowledge statements can help the LLM to provide more detailed and comprehensive answers to questions.
  • Reduced bias: Generated knowledge prompting can help to reduce the bias of LLMs’ responses. This is because the knowledge statements can help the LLM to consider a wider range of perspectives when generating responses.

However, there are also some challenges associated with using generated knowledge prompting:

  • Data collection: The first challenge is to collect the knowledge statements that will be used to prompt the LLM. This can be a time-consuming and expensive process.
  • Knowledge integration: The second challenge is to integrate the knowledge statements into the LLM’s model in a way that is effective. This can be a complex and challenging task.
  • Evaluation: The third challenge is to evaluate the effectiveness of generated knowledge prompting. This can be difficult, as there is no gold standard for evaluating the performance of LLMs on commonsense reasoning tasks.

Despite these challenges, generated knowledge prompting is a promising technique that has the potential to significantly improve the performance of LLMs on a variety of tasks. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more applications of generated knowledge prompting in the future.

Tree of Thoughts (ToT) Prompting

Tree of Thoughts (ToT) prompting is a technique that uses a hierarchical structure to guide a large language model (LLM) to generate a desired response. The hierarchical structure is called a “tree of thoughts,” and it is typically provided to the LLM in the prompt.

The tree of thoughts is a way of breaking down a task into smaller, more manageable steps. Each step in the tree of thoughts is a thought, and the thoughts are connected to each other by logical relationships. The LLM can then use the tree of thoughts to generate a response by following the logical relationships between the thoughts.

Here are some examples of tree of thoughts prompts:

  • Solving a math problem:
    • Prompt: “Solve the following math problem: 2 + 2 = ?”
    • Tree of thoughts:
      • First, add 2 and 2.
      • Then, the answer is 4.
  • Answering a question:
    • Prompt: “What is the capital of France?”
    • Tree of thoughts:
      • First, define what it means for a city to be the capital of a country.
      • Then, determine which city is the capital of France.
  • Generating a creative text format:
    • Prompt: “Write a poem about love.”
    • Tree of thoughts:
      • First, define what it means for a poem to be about love.
      • Then, brainstorm some ideas for the poem.
      • Finally, write the poem.

ToT prompting has been shown to be effective for a variety of tasks, and it is a promising technique that has the potential to significantly improve the performance of LLMs on a variety of tasks.

Here are some of the benefits of using ToT prompting:

  • Improved accuracy: ToT prompting can help to improve the accuracy of LLMs on a variety of tasks. This is because the tree of thoughts provides the LLM with a clear and structured way to approach the task.
  • Increased informativeness: ToT prompting can also help to increase the informativeness of LLMs’ responses. This is because the tree of thoughts can help the LLM to provide more detailed and comprehensive answers to questions.
  • Reduced bias: ToT prompting can help to reduce the bias of LLMs’ responses. This is because the tree of thoughts can help the LLM to consider a wider range of perspectives when generating responses.

However, there are also some challenges associated with using ToT prompting:

  • Complexity: The tree of thoughts can be complex and difficult to create.
  • Flexibility: The tree of thoughts can be inflexible, and it may not be able to adapt to unexpected situations.
  • Evaluation: It can be difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of ToT prompting.

Despite these challenges, ToT prompting is a promising technique that has the potential to significantly improve the performance of LLMs on a variety of tasks. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more applications of ToT prompting in the future.

Self-Consistency Prompting

Self-consistency prompting is a technique that uses the idea of self-consistency to improve the performance of large language models (LLMs) on a variety of tasks. The basic idea is to prompt the LLM to generate a response that is consistent with its own previous responses.

For example, if the LLM is prompted to generate a poem about love, it will be more likely to generate a poem that is consistent with its previous responses about love. This is because the LLM will be able to use its own previous responses as a guide for generating the new response.

Self-consistency prompting has been shown to be effective for a variety of tasks, including:

  • Generating creative text formats: Self-consistency prompting has been shown to improve the quality of creative text formats, such as poems, code, scripts, musical pieces, email, letters, etc. This is because the self-consistency prompt helps the LLM to stay on track and to avoid generating responses that are inconsistent with its previous responses.
  • Answering questions in an informative way: Self-consistency prompting has also been shown to improve the informativeness of LLMs’ responses to questions. This is because the self-consistency prompt helps the LLM to consider its previous responses when generating new responses. This can help the LLM to provide more detailed and comprehensive answers to questions.
  • Solving problems: Self-consistency prompting has also been shown to improve the performance of LLMs on problem-solving tasks. This is because the self-consistency prompt helps the LLM to stay on track and to avoid generating responses that are inconsistent with its previous responses. This can help the LLM to solve problems more effectively.

Here are some examples of self-consistency prompts:

  • Generating a poem about love:
    • Prompt: “Write a poem about love. The poem should be consistent with your previous responses about love.”
  • Answering a question:
    • Prompt: “What is the capital of France? Your answer should be consistent with your previous responses about the capital of France.”
  • Solving a math problem:
    • Prompt: “Solve the following math problem: 2 + 2 = ? Your answer should be consistent with your previous responses about math problems.”

Self-consistency prompting is a promising technique that has the potential to significantly improve the performance of LLMs on a variety of tasks. As the technique continues to develop, we can expect to see even more applications of self-consistency prompting in the future.

Tips and Best Practices

Here are some general tips and best practices for creating effective prompts for natural language tasks using ChatGPT:

  • Use clear and concise language that is easy to understand by both humans and machines.
  • Provide enough examples to cover different cases and variations of the task, but not too many that might confuse or overwhelm the model.
  • Use consistent formatting and punctuation for the examples and the query.
  • Use relevant and specific keywords that can help the model infer the task and the domain.
  • Avoid using ambiguous or vague terms that might have multiple meanings or interpretations.
  • Avoid using biased or offensive language that might harm or offend anyone.
  • Test your prompts on different texts and questions to see how the model responds and adjust them accordingly.
  • Have fun and be creative!

We hope this blog post has given you some insights into how to use ChatGPT to learn prompt engineering for some common natural language tasks. You can visit https://chatgpt.com/ to start creating your own prompts and see what ChatGPT can do. Happy prompting!’

What is prompt engineering?

Prompt engineering is the process of crafting effective prompts that can help improve the quality of responses from AI tools like ChatGPT. It involves designing prompts that are clear, concise, and specific enough to elicit the desired response.

How can I improve my prompt engineering skills?

To improve your prompt engineering skills, you can start by experimenting with different types of prompts and evaluating their effectiveness. You can also study examples of effective prompts and try to identify what makes them work.

What are some best practices for prompt engineering?

Some best practices for prompt engineering include keeping your prompts clear and concise, providing specific instructions when necessary, and avoiding ambiguity or vagueness.

How can I integrate ChatGPT with other applications?

You can integrate ChatGPT with other applications using APIs that allow you to set and evaluate prompts programmatically. This approach provides a high degree of flexibility and allows you to directly integrate ChatGPT with a broad range of applications.

What is the difference between prompt engineering and fine-tuning?

Prompt engineering and fine-tuning are two different ways of adapting a language model to a specific task. Prompt engineering is about providing enough context, instruction and examples at inference time without changing the model parameters. Fine tuning is about updating the model parameters using a dataset that captures the distribution of tasks you want it to accomplish. 

The future is here.  Embrace, learn and grow your skills with our newest ChatGPT training course.  

One Response

  1. Hey there! As someone just diving into the IT world, I found your article on ChatGPT Prompt Engineering incredibly insightful. It’s fascinating how AI can be tailored to meet specific needs, and your explanations made the concepts really accessible for beginners like me. Can’t wait to experiment with these ideas in my own projects!

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Network Security Analyst Career Path

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Total Hours
96 Hrs 49 Min
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419 On-demand Videos

Original price was: $129.00.Current price is: $51.60.

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Leadership Mastery: The Executive Information Security Manager

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Total Hours
95 Hrs 38 Min
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346 On-demand Videos

Original price was: $129.00.Current price is: $51.60.

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